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Alexandrite

Alexandrite

Named after the later Tsar Alexander II, the alexandrite belongs to a variety of the chrysoberyl. It appears green in daylight and shimmers red in artificial light. A special rarity is the alexandrite cat’s eye, which mesmerises by creating a light effect of a cat’s eye.
The alexandrite was first found in the Urals in 1830, but today other deposits can be found in Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe and Brazil.

Amethyst

Amethyst

The amethyst is one of the most famous gemstones in the quartz group. Due to its violet to red-violet colour, the amethyst is the most widely used quartz variety for jewellery. The stone gets its violet colour from the colouring matter iron.

The most important deposits are located in Brazil, Madagascar and Zambia. In addition, there are amethyst deposits on almost every continent. Even in Idar-Oberstein, the amethyst was prominently represented at the beginning of the gemstone trade.

Aquamarine

Aquamarine

The aquamarine belongs to the beryl family. Aquamarine is available in a wide variety of shades of blue, from delicate light blue to deep dark seawater blue. This is where its name comes from, aqua marina, which means “seawater colour” in Latin. The most expensive aquamarine colour is the deep blue and is also commercially known as the “Santa Maria colour”. The origin of this name comes from the mine of the same name in Brazil, which initially produced particularly dark aquamarines.

Beryl

Beryl

The term noble beryl includes all colour varieties of beryl, with the exception of the varieties of aquamarine and emerald. The colour spectrum of the beryl covers almost all pastel shades, with stones with an intense colour saturation fetching higher prices. The best-known precious beryls are gold beryl and morganite. Beryl is found in Africa, Sri Lanka and the USA.

Chrysoberyl

Chrysoberyl

Despite its name, the chrysoberyl does not belong to the beryl group. It is characterised by its high hardness of 8.5 and catches the eye with its shiny brilliance. The partly neon yellow variant of chrysoberyl is little known, but is fascinating in itself. Alexandrite, on the other hand, is very well known and expensive – a chrysoberyl with colour-changing properties. Alexandrite shines green in natural light and red in artificial light.

Citrine

Citrine

The name of the citrine is derived from Latin and means lemon, which refers to the colour spectrum of the citrine, which ranges from lemon yellow to orange gold. Like the amethyst, the citrine belongs to the group of crystals. Madeira citrine is one of the most valuable citrines thanks to its dark orange colour. The stone is found, for example, in Africa, South America and Namibia.

Gemstones

Gemstones

Gemstones take millions of years to form in nature. They are created without artificial interference and are particularly valuable due to their rarity and beauty.

Each gem is inherently unique due to its colour and degree of purity. But only the right cut gives it individuality. This means that our gemstones have everything you need to really show off your jewellery.

Vier Edelsteine der Gruppe Granat in dunkel rot

Garnet

The garnet is characterised by its versatile colouring and high refraction. It comes in all colours except blue. Well-known representatives of the garnet group are the tsavorite or demantoid. In trade, the term “garnet” is mostly used for the dark red variety. Garnets are found, for example, in Africa or in parts of Asia.

Grossular

Grossular

The grossular belongs to the group of garnets and is characterised by its bright, fresh, mint green colour. The intense green and emerald green garnets also belong to the group of grossulars; however, they are called tsavorites because of their rarity and high price. Grossulars can be found in Tanzania, Kenya, South Africa, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

Turmaline - green, cushion, 14x11 mm, 9,69 cts, Nr. TR10101

Highlights

On our highlights page you can find an exclusive selection of new and unique gemstones. Let this selection inspire you to create unique pieces of jewellery.

Iolite

Iolite

The iolite or – as the gemmologists call it – cordierite is found on all continents. The most important sites are, however, in South India and Sri Lanka. The iolite is easy to identify thanks to its two colours: if the stone appears in its typical blue-violet colour in one direction, it can appear more yellowish or greyish when tilted by 90°.

Mali-Granat

Mali-Garnet

The Mali garnet also belongs to the group of garnets and is a rather unknown coloured gemstone. As its name suggests, it comes from the Mali region. It has a yellow to yellow-green colour and a beautiful brilliance due to its high refraction.

Mandarin-Granat

Mandarin Garnet

The mandarin garnet or also spessartite garnet rounds up the group of garnets. The outdated name spessartite comes from the first known site of the garnet species in the Spessartite area in Germany. Nowadays, the name mandarin garnet is common because the bright orange colour is reminiscent of a mandarin.

The orange garnets are mostly found in Brazil, Namibia, Mozambique or Kenya.

Moonstone

Moonstone

The silvery-bluish shimmer of the moonstone is reminiscent of the light of the moon, hence the name. The characteristic shimmering effect of potash feldspar is also known as adularescence. The moonstone consists of a large number of lamellas that have grown together and create a special shimmer due to the light reflection. The stone belonging to the group of feldspars can be found in Sri Lanka, Brazil or also in India.

Morganite

Morganite

The morganite joins the beryl group and is mainly found in Brazil, Madagascar, Mozambique and Afghanistan. Due to its delicate pink, it is also known as pink beryl. The gemstone owes its name to the American gemstone enthusiast and banker J. P. Morgan.

Paraiba-Turmalin

Paraiba tourmaline

As its name suggests, the Paraiba tourmaline belongs to the group of tourmalines and is by far the rarest and most coveted variety of tourmaline. It was first found in Brazil in the northeaster state of Paraiba in 1989. Today, Paraiba tourmalines are mined in Mozambique and Nigeria, although these sites produce very little material that is worth cutting for. The mines in Brazil have long been depleted and no longer produce gemstones.

Paraiba tourmalines are popular because of their unusual, neon blue colour. This characteristic, intensely bright blue is also called swimming pool blue.

Peridot

Peridot

The name peridot comes from the Greek and means uncertain. The peculiarity of the peridot is its yellow-green colour. It is one of the few stones that only appear in green. The most important deposits are located in North America, Africa and Pakistan. There are few rare specimens from Norway.

Smooky Quarz

Smokey quarz

The smoky quartz belongs, as the name suggests, to the group of quartzes and is characterized by its grey colour. This colour can appear very dark up to a light grey tone. Often the smoky quartz is heated at low temperatures to make the colour lighter.

Rhodolite

Rhodolite

The rhodolite, also called rose garnet, owes its name to the violet-red to pink-red colour. “Rhodes” comes from the Greek and means rose. The rhodolite belongs to the group of garnets. Thanks to its violet-red colour, it was already a sought-after gemstone during the Roman Empire. The most important deposits are located in Asia and Africa.

Royal Purple Garnet

Royal purple garnet

The royal purple garnet is characterised by its intense violet tone, which ranges from intensely reddish to cool bluish purple tones. The high refraction of the garnet makes the violet colour sparkle strongly, which makes the stone particularly attractive. The royal purple garnet is a mixed crystal between the two garnet varieties pyrope and almandine. The gemstone has only been known in the trade for a few years. The stones are found in Mozambique and Tanzania.

Rubellit

Rubellite

Rubellite belongs to the group of tourmalines. The name rubellite is derived from the Latin “reddish”. Rubellite occurs in different shades of red, but the ruby colour is the most valuable. Most of the rubellite show strong inclusions, only very rarely are gemstones without inclusions found. Rubellite is mostly mined in Brazil, Nigeria and Mozambique.

Saphir

Saphir

The sapphire is one of the most famous gemstones in the world and belongs to the group of corundum. Above all, the sapphire is characterized by its enormous variety of colors. The most sought-after colours of the sapphire are, on the one hand, the "Royal Blue", a deep radiant blue and the padparadscha orange, a bright orange, which is supposed to remind us of the sunset of a summer night.

Smaragd

Emerald

The emerald is considered one of the oldest gemstones used by humans. Its history goes back to ancient Egypt. Many of the most valuable pieces of jewellery or unique treasures are made of emeralds. For example, the Vienna Treasury holds a small vessel made of a 2680 carat emerald – it is the largest cut emerald in the world.

Colombia is the most famous country of origin for emeralds due to its classic blue-green colour. But they also come from Brazil, Zambia, Ethiopia, Madagascar and other countries.

Spinel

Spinel

Due to its Mohs hardness of 8, the spinel is one of the hardest coloured gemstones and is therefore ideal for processing as a piece of jewellery. The spinel occurs in different colours, with the red and cobalt blue spinel being the most valuable varieties.

The most important deposits of the spinel are located in Myanmar, Tanzania, Vietnam and Tajikistan. It is interesting that prominent gemstones from the British crown jewels were mistakenly thought to be rubies for a long time – in reality they are spinels.

Tanzanite

Tanzanite

The tanzanite can only be found at one site worldwide – near Arusha in Tanzania. The blue-violet stone is a variety of the zoisite group and owes its name to the American jeweller Tiffany, who named the stone after its location. The marketing by Tiffany made the tanzanite known worldwide. Today, it is one of the most popular coloured gemstones.

Topaz

Topaz

The most valuable topazes have a pink to reddish-orange colour, with the colouring substances being primarily iron and chromium. The colour yellow is most common in topazes. Due to the high cleavage, the stones should be processed with care. The most important deposits are located in Brazil, Sri Lanka, Russia or Nigeria.

Tsavorite

Tsavorite

The tsavorite is a green variety from the garnet group. The stone owes its name to the Kenyan place of discovery – it was discovered in 1974 in Tsavo National Park in Kenya. The tsavorite impress with their intense green to emerald green colour. Today the main countries of origin are Kenya and Tanzania.

Tourmaline

Tourmaline

The variety of colours is typical of the group of tourmalines. The name is derived from the Sinhalese word Turmali, which means “stone with mixed colours”. Tourmalines come in all colours and cover the entire colour spectrum within one colour group. In addition, there are usually several colours in just one crystal. There are many names for the different colour variations, for example rubellite for the red variety or indigolite for blue tourmalines. Tourmalines are easy to process and are therefore particularly popular gemstones for production of jewellery.